Scots Wha Ha’ (Scots Who Have)

Below are the lyrics to an ancient Scottish folk song, the tune of which is thought to have been played by Bruce’s army at the battle of Bannockburn in 1314.* The song is beautifully performed by Celtic Balladeer Charlie Zahm.

Take the time to listen along as you scan the lyrics (thought to have been derived from a speech given by Robert the Bruce before the battle of Bannockburn.) For meanings on some of the words, refer to the chart in the Wikipedia article linked below. Enjoy.

Scots wha ha’e wae Wallace bled,
Scots wham Bruce ha’e aftimes led,
Welcome tae your gory bed,
Or tae victory

Now’s the day and now’s the hour,
See the front o’ battle lour,
See approach proud Edward’s power,
Chains and slavery

Wha will be a traitor knave,
Wha can fill a coward’s grave
Wha sae base as be a slave,
let him turn and flee,

Wha for Scotland’s king and law,
Freedom’s sword will strongly draw,
Freemen stand or freeman fa,
let him follow me.

By oppression’s woes and pains,
By your sons in servile chains,
We will drain our dearest veins,
But they shall be free.

Lay the proud usurpers low,
Tyrants fall in every foe,
Liberty’s in every blow,
let us do or dee.

* As noted in the Wikipedia article here

2016-08-09T02:33:01+00:00 July 30th, 2007|History, Quotes|

More Quadricentennial Pictures

Here are a few more photos from last week’s event. Among the greatest honors was meeting Dr. Morecraft who I found to be incredibly humble, kind and approachable, and who has been instrumental in igniting my interest in church history, particularly in the era surrounding and including the Reformation. Of course meeting the grandson of the tenth president of the United States (Harrison Tyler, grandson of John Tyler) was quite an honor as well.

The men who made it all happen — My Dad and Mr. Moss

The men who made it all happen — My Dad and Mr. Moss

Men of the clan O' Turley

Men of the clan O’ Turley

Dr. Joe Morecraft and me

Dr. Joe Morecraft and me

Harrison Tyler (Grandson of the 10th U.S. President) and me

Harrison Tyler (Grandson of the 10th U.S. President) and me

Balloon rides at Fort Pocahontas, the Tyler estate

Balloon rides at Fort Pocahontas, the Tyler estate

Peering straight up into the balloon

Peering straight up into the balloon

Dressing up is fun!

Dressing up is fun!

Dr. Morecraft with Mary

Dr. Morecraft with Mary

High profile visitors — President Tyler and President Roosevelt

High profile visitors — President Tyler and President Roosevelt

A monument planted by the Grateful Children of America

A monument planted by the Grateful Children of America

2017-02-22T16:44:13+00:00 June 22nd, 2007|Family, History|

The Quadricentennial Celebration

We’ve returned from Virginia, where we celebrated the four-hundredth anniversary of the English landing at Jamestown. Thanks to Aunt Elaine and my mother, we all were able to show up in costume! Sam and I, as well as Josh and Justice Phillips, had the privilege of taking part in the re-enactment of the first landing. Pictures of this and others are below. There are more pictures forthcoming.

The English settlers on the James

The English settlers on the James

The settlers row to shore

The settlers row to shore

The disembarkation of the English

The disembarkation of the English

Rev. Hunt talks to the men

Rev. Hunt talks to the men

The new land is claimed in the name of Jesus Christ...

The new land is claimed in the name of Jesus Christ…

...and in the name of James, King of England

…and in the name of James, King of England

Colonial Era fife and drums for atmosphere

Colonial Era fife and drums for atmosphere

Finished with the re-enactment

Finished with the re-enactment

Strike a pose..

Strike a pose..

... there's nothing to it

… there’s nothing to it

The cast and crew from boat number two

The cast and crew from boat number two

Joshua & Samuel — Gentlemen Adventurers

Joshua & Samuel — Gentlemen Adventurers

Sam and Cassie Young

Sam and Cassie Young

The scene at Colonial Williamsburg

The scene at Colonial Williamsburg

Dressed to the nines — The Shough family

Dressed to the nines — The Shough family

...and the Vernier family

…and the Vernier family

2017-02-22T16:44:13+00:00 June 21st, 2007|Family, History|

The Yankee, Defined

I found the following quote by Nicholas Davis, Confederate Chaplain of the 1st Texas Infantry, to be interesting. He defines for us the meaning of the New Englanders’ nickname, “Yankee”:

The popular name for the citizens of New England. This is what Webster says it means, “…a name for the people of New England” and, as their history is well-known to the civilized world, the whole world will understand us. The word extends to all their ten thousand schemes of deception and fraud and comprehends their every act of lying and stealing… from the days of Washington to the present hour… in all their political, legislative, executive, commercial, civil, moral, literary, sacred, profane, theological, and diabolical history.

The word Yankee when thus applied means meddlesome, impudent, insulant, pompous, boastful, unkind, ungrateful, unjust, knavish, false, deceitful, cowardly, swindling, thieving, robbing, brutal, and murderous. This Yankee country has given birth to Socialism, Mormonism, Spiritualism, and Abolitionism with every other devilism which has cursed the nation of unionism.

2016-08-24T20:11:20+00:00 May 9th, 2007|History, Quotes|

Day Seven in the UK

This morning we took a walk around Chipping Campden, stopping to view the church in the center of town as well as enjoy the cottages and their gardens along the way. There were many beautifully-kept gardens throughout the neighborhoods, and a number of the houses still had the older style thatched roofs. Around noon we began to make our way back to London. Along the way, we stopped to see Churchill’s grave site, a very modest display actually. We also pulled over whenever there was a good photographic opportunity. Arriving in London, we checked into our hotel, and took the subway to the center of town, meeting a friend of Matt’s. Mr. Jones took us in and he and his family demonstrated very warm Christian hospitality towards us. We had a lovely dinner and engaging conversation, including stories from Mrs. Jones Sr. about hiding out in the underground during the bombings of WWII. Wow! Thank you Jones family! The following morning, we got up early to head back to Gatwick airport and fly back home. The whirlwind tour has ended!

The church tower through the trees

The church tower through the trees

Welcome to Chipping Campden

Welcome to Chipping Campden

A view down the main street

A view down the main street

The ancient sheep market in the town center

The ancient sheep market in the town center

The Eight Bells Inn

The Eight Bells Inn

St. James Church

St. James Church

A beautiful thatched roof, not uncommon in this area

A beautiful thatched roof, not uncommon in this area

En route back to London

En route back to London

An inconspicuous burial for a historically conspicuous figure

An inconspicuous burial for a historically conspicuous figure

The Church St. Martin Bladon

The Church St. Martin Bladon

A lovely dinner at the Jones'

A lovely dinner at the Jones’

Our gracious hosts

Our gracious hosts

2017-02-22T16:44:14+00:00 April 24th, 2007|Family, History|

Day Six in the UK

We left St. Andrews this morning and headed back for England, our destination being Chipping Campden, an ancient sheep village in the middle of a very pastoral region west of London known as the Cotswolds. It rained nearly throughout the entire drive, but there couldn’t have been a better time for it to rain. This was the only day we were in the car most of the day and unable to see anything anyway. We arrived in the evening in Chipping Campden just in time to see the sun setting on the golden stone out of which the entire town is made. We ate at the inn known as the Eight Bells, established in the 1300s, and rested for the night.

2017-02-22T16:44:14+00:00 April 23rd, 2007|Family, History|

Day Five in the UK

We started our day today with a Sunday morning service at St. Gile’s Cathedral, afterwards leaving Edinburgh and making our way through the countryside towards Stirling. Here we saw Stirling Castle near which Wallace and his troops defeated the English at the battle of Stirling Bridge. We then ventured across the valley to the Wallace monument which housed Wallace’s actual sword. His sword was about my height standing on end and weighs something like fifty pounds. To be able to wield a sword of this size for any period of time, he must have been a giant of a man. We also visited the Church of the Holy Rude next to Stirling Castle where, at the age of thirteen months, King James I was crowned King. Leaving Stirling, we went on to St. Andrews where we visited the death place of two Reformation martyrs, George Wishart and Patrick Hamilton.

Tower of the Church of the Holy Rude

Tower of the Church of the Holy Rude

The ancient graveyards behind the church

The ancient graveyards behind the church

Stirling Castle

Stirling Castle

A fascinating arms demonstration

A fascinating arms demonstration

The William Wallace Monument

The William Wallace Monument

Sporting native garb atop the Wallace Monument

Sporting native garb atop the Wallace Monument

Cathedral across from the castle wherein Wishart was imprisoned and sentenced to death

Cathedral across from the castle wherein Wishart was imprisoned and sentenced to death

The spot where reformation hero Patrick Hamilton was burnt at the stake

The spot where reformation hero Patrick Hamilton was burnt at the stake

2017-02-22T16:44:14+00:00 April 22nd, 2007|Family, History|

Day Four in the UK

After spending our first of two nights at Carberry Tower, we ventured over to Edinburgh, just a few minutes away. We visited the church where John Knox used to preach, St. Giles, and also were able to visit his house. We also visited Edinburgh Castle which is on the top of the hill, the very highest point of the city. Afterwards we drove through the Scottish countryside to see what we could see (all the while wholly dependent on what has proven to be our indispensable GPS system). To close, a quote demonstrating why certain men were chosen of God to spark the Protestant Reformation… those who feared God rather than man (or woman for that matter). Bold, manly, unabashed:

First they ought to remove from honour and authority that monster in nature — so call I a woman clad in the habit of a man, yea, a woman against nature reigning above man.

— John Knox

We're staying in a place called Carberry tower...

We’re staying in a place called Carberry tower…

...a 14th C. mansion just outside Edinburgh

…a 14th C. mansion just outside Edinburgh

A shot down the Royal Mile — Edinburgh, Scotland

A shot down the Royal Mile — Edinburgh, Scotland

St. Gile's Cathedral - Edinburgh

St. Gile’s Cathedral – Edinburgh

Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

We nearly lost one fourth of our regiment at the castle!

We nearly lost one fourth of our regiment at the castle!

Flexing the Royal Military muscle

Flexing the Royal Military muscle

A good ol' Scottish marching band

A good ol’ Scottish marching band

What's a trip to Scotland without bagpipes?

What’s a trip to Scotland without bagpipes?

The Edinburgh home of beloved reformer John Knox

The Edinburgh home of beloved reformer John Knox

Stepping back in time — Matt dressed as John Knox

Stepping back in time — Matt dressed as John Knox

Just 1000 acres in this part of the world... that's all I'm asking

Just 1000 acres in this part of the world… that’s all I’m asking

2017-02-22T16:44:14+00:00 April 21st, 2007|Family, History|

Day Three in the UK

Well we made it to York after all, located in the area of England known as Yorkshire. We rested very briefly and then started our day with a visit to York Minster, a very impressive Cathedral dating back to the 12th century I believe. In it were a number of bishops’ tombs from the early 1200s. It was in this cathedral, we are told, that Constantine was crowned as Emperor. A statue of him shown below is right outside the cathedral. Apparently the Romans conquered the Bigantes people and others that were already in the area and there is to this day a major portion of the Roman city wall standing around what was at the time the perimeter of the city. Medieval walls from the 1200s – 1400s are built right on top of the Roman wall in many places. The town was already around, but was more officially established in A.D. 71. Yes… A.D. 71. York is over nineteen hundred years old.

Also pictured below is a Roman pillar unearthed not too long ago during an archaeological dig. This is also on display outside the minster. Another image below displays one portion of the wall where there are several tombs displayed that were also unearthed. These tombs are ancient and date back to the Roman occupation time. Among the scarce remains in one of them were red locks of hair! Hmmmm… the history of red hair… very interesting.

After leaving York, we made our way north, stopping first at Skirpenbeck, ancestral home of the Chanceys (Chaunceys) who fought with William the Conqueror at the battle of Hastings in 1066. The church from the 1000s is still there and standing. Services are still held there once per month. We traveled on further and eventually came to Scotland where we are staying tonight. We are about ten minutes from Edinburgh where we intend to go tomorrow, staying in a place known as The Carberry Tower. I think we can learn to be content here.

The imposing York Minster

The imposing York Minster

Just a few in a long row of past rulers of York

Just a few in a long row of past rulers of York

Posing by the unearthed Roman column

Posing by the unearthed Roman column

A wonderfully arrogant pose... Emperor Constantine

A wonderfully arrogant pose… Emperor Constantine

The remaining ruins of the abbey in York

The remaining ruins of the abbey in York

Portion of the ancient Roman wall and tombs

Portion of the ancient Roman wall and tombs

Medieval portion of the city wall

Medieval portion of the city wall

A view outside of York

A view outside of York

A couple'a classy blokes

A couple’a classy blokes

The Chancey ancestral home... Skirpenbeck

The Chancey ancestral home… Skirpenbeck

Eleventh century St. Mary's in Skirpenbeck

Eleventh century St. Mary’s in Skirpenbeck

Why 'ello there

Why ‘ello there

A wild English pheasant

A wild English pheasant

I really am on this trip, too... see!

I really am on this trip, too… see!

2017-02-22T16:44:14+00:00 April 20th, 2007|Family, History|