1984

1984

1984

First Grade Class of '87

First Grade Class of ’87

Do you remember 1984? Not the Orwell novel, I mean the year. A lot happened that year. We hosted the Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, NASA launched the shuttle Discovery… but, more importantly, I turned five and played on the YMCA little league soccer team. So which soccer star am I? Can you tell? You can click through to the larger size if you can’t see well enough. If you still can’t, and you give up, click here for a zoomed-in version. I’ll give you a hint: I’ve got the best socks and shorts on the team.

The above were pictures that I found as we were cleaning out some old files in preparation to move. Talk about a trip through the past! Number two is first grade. I no longer condone government schools, but if one absolutely had to, for some unavoidable reason, go to government school, I would recommend Mrs. Hudson (in red); probably the sweetest and kindest teacher that ever walked this earth. Under her tutelage primarily, I learned to read, and for a spell, I even liked math! As far as teachers are concerned, it was pretty much downhill from there (with a few notable exceptions).

2017-02-22T16:44:15+00:00 November 7th, 2006|Family, History|

Perspective

A fantastic dose of perspective from the past:

In spite of failures which I lament, of errors which I now see and acknowledge, or of the present aspect of affairs, do I despair the future? The truth is this: the march of Providence is so slow, our desires so impatient, the work of progress is so immense, and our means of aiding it so feeble, the life of humanity is so long, that of the individual so brief, that we often see only the ebb of the advancing wave and are thus discouraged. It is history that teaches us to hope. —Robert E. Lee

Give ear, O my people, to my law: incline your ears to the words of my mouth. I will open my mouth in a parable; I will utter dark sayings of old; which we have heard and known, and our fathers have told us. We will not hide them from their children, shewing to the generation to come the praises of the LORD, and his strength, and his wonderful works that he hath done. —Psalm 78:1-4

2017-02-22T16:44:15+00:00 October 26th, 2006|History, Quotes|

A New Car

My New Car

My New Car

Yesterday, in the span of less than twenty-four hours, we flew into Florida, checked into and out of our hotel, purchased a car and drove seven-hundred miles, stopping for the night in Mobile, Alabama. Above is a picture of the setting sun in west Florida. It’s certainly no Arizona sunset, but it was still quite lovely. This morning we were able to stop and see the U.S.S Alabama and the submarine nearby, the U.S.S. Drum. This ship served, among other operations, in the second world war. Machine guns and canon barrels protruded from nearly every section of the ship, and the vessel was said to weigh over forty-two thousand tons. Yet, somehow it floats. Amazing! I found the following inscription regarding the deliberate choice of colors to be interesting:

When first commissioned, Alabama was painted shades of blue-gray in a dapple pattern. She was repainted for her first combat deployment so that her blue hull would be less visible against the ocean when seen from other ships. She was painted entirely blue in 1944 so she would be less noticeable from Japanese aircraft. In 1945 she reverted to gray upper works and blue hull camouflage. When Alabama was decommissioned to the reserve fleet in 1947 she was painted gray and remained gray until restored to her wartime colors in 1992.

A Florida sunset

A Florida sunset

Where the Alabama has been

Where the Alabama has been

Big guns

Big guns

The ship from afar

The ship from afar

Another interesting plaque nearby displayed the various places that the Alabama had traveled to (or if you prefer, the various places to which the Alabama had traveled. Is that better, Chris? 🙂 ). It seemed from the map that there were few places on the globe unvisited by the Alabama. While we toured the ship, everywhere we went, the sounds of the World War II generation were heard, which I thought really helped to be transported back into the era and mindset of the men who served on this ship. In the gift shop, we were able to find a CD of the music being played aboard the Alabama. Click here to go to the sounds page where you’ll hear a popular Glenn Miller piece we heard today.

2017-02-22T16:44:15+00:00 September 24th, 2006|Family, History|

Photoshoot at the Alamo

Yesterday, the whole VF staff was downtown for the annual catalogue staff photo shoot. We had the staff shot taken in front of the Alamo again which I love because of the unique historical icon that it is to San Antonio. Pictured here is a statue of one of the heroes of the Alamo, William Barret Travis, beautifully cast by a local sculptor. The piece is found in the lobby of a historic downtown San Antonio hotel called The Menger. The cutout you see here was done in Photoshop courtesy of Joshua and Justice Phillps. Well done, don’t you think?

William Barret Travis

William Barret Travis

 

2017-02-22T16:44:15+00:00 September 14th, 2006|Family, History|